Grazing patterns of bison vs. cattle in response to management strategies designed to improve habitat for Species at Risk

It is well established that livestock producers are effective land stewards and contribute to high productivity and wildlife habitat on grazed lands. The effectiveness of many management practices are established, but uncertainty remains, particularly in interactions between practices at large-scales. We propose to track grazing patterns of bison and cattle using GPS collars at the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC) Old Man on His Back Conservation Area (OMB) in response to various strategies (e.g. burning, fencing, weed control) over 3 years at multiple scales of observation (e.g.

Ecosystem Services and Food Security for the Lil’wat Nation

The Lil’wat Nation is working to foster community food security by restoring and activating Indigenous knowledge around traditional food systems. Our project examines ‘Ecosystem Services’ approaches as one way to support local food security while also protecting culturally-important environmental services. Led by a Lil’wat Food Committee, this project will engage community members in community planning and visioning exercises that evaluate what future paths for environmental stewardship are the highest priority.

Achieving quality control during veneer drying by using big data statistics

Veneer drying has traditionally been done using a qualitative approach. Although it is effective in assessing how any modification in parameters impacts veneer quality, it often yields a significant loss in quality due to delays involved in reaching the kiln's steady state following parameter modification. However, kilns are now being equipped with various sensors that allow the tracking of many parameters related to both the kiln and the veneers. The research objective is to link raw material characteristics with the veneer drying process.

Achieving aspirations of Canadian aboriginal communities through participatory cultural mapping and dynamic decision modelling

The aspirations of aboriginal communities are a critical part of decision making regarding land and resource use, policy and community development, and strategic planning. To help achieve aboriginal aspirations, this project aims to
develop, apply, and evaluate a novel approach to aid aboriginal community decision making and solution creation/implementation.

Stand and stock table projection system for Interior Douglas-fir in the central interior of British Columbia

Forest management in Canada will be more and more constrained by species habitat requirements as well as the risks and results of natural disturbances. The recent, sever Mountain Pine Beetle outbreak in the interior of British Columbia resulted in a harvest shortage of lodgepole pine in this region. Forest managers now rely heavily on non-pine harvests, mainly within the Interior Douglas-fire forest type. This forest type requires partial cutting and is further constrained by several ecological and social forest management objectives.

Alternative management of pulp and paper mill sludge: a cost-effective solution to generate carbon offsets - Year Two

Pulp and paper mill sludge (PPMS) is the main organic residual generated from the wastewater treatment of the pulp and paper industry. In Quebec’s province, an annual amount of 400 000 tons of PPMS are landfilled. Pilot scale measurements in 2013-2014 indicated that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from landfilling were the highest compared to agricultural or energy uses.

Modelling wood quality and its implications for lumber recovery in variable retention stands

For many reasons, forest management in Canada will be constrained by ecological and social forest management objectives. Along with meeting the diverse needs of society, forest managers will need to consider increased demands for renewable resources, such as wood. Wood, as opposed to concrete and steel, has a positive impact on the global carbon cycle but is also strong enough to build large buildings. Therefore, there will be an increased demand for stronger wood in the future.

Cisgenic AG704.10 potato cultivar with enhanced late blight resistance and mineral bioavailability

Potato crop suffers from several devastating diseases. Genetic resistance is the best way to manage these diseases but potato is sexually quite incompatible. A novel technology called genome editing offers genetic improvement, similar to conventional breeding, where the susceptible genes in a cultivar are cut and replaced with disease resistance genes from another cultivar, with no change to rest of the genome.

Methods to assess botanical extracts for potential plant growth stimulating or pest growth inhibiting action on crops

Botanical extracts with the potential to stimulate crop plant growth or performance must be rigorous tested as part of new product development. Similarly, botanical extracts that control microbial growth on plant tissues (including plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, nematodes, etc.) or that control insect or arachnid pests on plants (aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs, mites, etc.) must be tested for unintended toxicity or inhibitory growth effects on plants.

Embedding a Climate Change videogame in High Schools: Towards a Teacher's Guide for Engaging Students with a Place-based Videogame – Future Delta 2.0

At the moment, BC has no comprehensive climate change curriculum in high schools, and educators lack coordinated materials to support its teaching. In an effort to narrow this gap, the Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP) at the Faculty of Forestry, UBC partnered with the Delta School District, to develop an educational and compelling videogame – Future Delta 2.0 (FD2), which brings together methods from commercial gaming a participatory research to address climate change science in an innovative place-based game environment.

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