Development of a model for computational sea ice monitoring

The proposed research project focuses on the development of a novel model for the computation of sea ice parameters in near real- time relying on satellite data. The interdisciplinary team will investigate solutions for high performance computing to monitor sea ice and calculate ice parameters with the high spatial resolution. This project includes R&D activities in sea ice modeling, calculating parameters of ocean interaction with sea ice and designing algorithms for satellite data processing and analysis.

Developing Tools to Track Vocalizing Marine Mammals with Long Baseline Hydrophone Arrays - Year two

My project aims to understand cetacean habitat use in remote areas along Canada's coast. Using acoustic data from an array of permanently recording hydrophones, I am developing software to automatically detect, classify, and localize different species of whales that use the area .
The acoustic network is located deep in the Great Bear Rainforest in northern British Columbia in thus in important habitat for Northern Resident Killer Whales, humpback whales, and fin whales.

An automated method for basin scale mapping of aquatic habitat using a UAV

This project will use a drone to map aquatic habitat in Carnation Creek. Research better characterizing fish habitat is critical given the declines seen in many coastal fish stocks. Traditional methods of surveying aquatic habitat are often physically demanding and limited to short channel segments. However, advances in fish ecology suggest that better management of fish species require research that links basin scale patterns in channel morphology to aquatic habitat; which is the scale fish complete their life histories.

Disturbance thresholds and factors influencing community dynamics of epiphytic cyanolichens in Nova Scotia, with an emphasis on rare and at-risk species

The coastal wet mixedwood forests of Nova Scotia are globally important for lichen biodiversity, but several lichen species are now declining or endangered. This is concerning for forest managers, because forest companies may be subject to penalties if they inadvertently destroy the habitat of an endangered species. The causes of lichen declines are not fully understood, but hypotheses include forest harvesting, acid deposition (from SO2 emissions), and grazing pressure from slugs.

Plankton food web pathways to juvenile salmon

Plankton food-webs are the primary support system for juvenile salmon, necessary for their growth, health, and ultimately survival at sea. Understanding how and why plankton food-webs respond to changing ocean conditions is one of the major goals of the Pacific Salmon Foundation, with the view to understanding fluctuations and declining trends of salmon stocks in the Salish Sea.

Spatial and Temporal Variability of Primary and Secondary Production in the Salish Sea from a Coupled Model (SalishSeaCast with SMELT)

The Pacific Salmon Foundation is leading a multi-year project: Salish Sea Marine Survival Program (SSMSP) to determine what is affecting the survival of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the Salish Sea. There are three hypotheses to investigate. The impact of availability of food for the fish, the predation on the fish and other factors including habitat loss. In this project we will use a model of the Strait of Georgia to help evaluate availability of food.

Sublethal effects of neurotoxic pesticides on bats: from cells to behavior

Pesticide application in crops has been considered a potential cause of bat population declines in Europe. However, no research on this topic has been conducted in tropical agrosystems, where the use of pesticides is extensive and bat diversity is higher. Considering that insectivorous bats can eat more than 90% of their body mass every night, species that hunt preferentially in crops could be highly exposed to pesticides through their prey. This study seeks to determine the sublethal effects of pesticides on bat species foraging in or near crops.

Investigating the Geochemistry of Selenium (Se) in the Residual from Biological Wastewater Treatment

Although selenium is an essential element for human and animal health, it has a narrow concentration range before becoming toxic. Industrial practices, such as mining, can result in elevated levels of selenium to be introduced into surface water bodies, hence, treating mine processing water and wastewater is commonly done to reduce the potential for environmental impacts. Bacterially mediated redox processes are currently used in the mining industry to remove selenium from wastewater. The byproduct of this treatment is a solid state residual which contains high concentrations of selenium.

Embedding Project

The Embedding Project is a public-benefit research project that relies on strong social science research methods to bring together thoughtful sustainability intrapreneurs from across industries and around the world, and harnesses their collective knowledge to develop rigorous and practical guidance that benefits everyone. This internship will offer an MBA student the opportunity to gain experience in both practice and research, while learning from leaders in the field.

Using structure-from-motion and 3D analysis to visualize habitat complexity and dynamics of glass sponge reefs in British Columbia

Glass sponges build their skeletons out of silicon dioxide (i.e. glass). While these animals are found all over the world in very deep water, they only exist shallower than 50 m in a few places in the world. In very rare cases, new sponges grow on top of existing, dead sponges and form reefs in a similar manner to coral reefs. As with coral reefs, the structure formed by the reefs is ecologically important because it provides complex habitat and shelter for other animals.

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